Monday, 23 April 2018

A - Z Challenge 2018 - T




The Blogging from A to Z Challenge is to post everyday (except Sunday) in the month of April 2016 starting with the letter A and going all the way to Z. The theme I chose is...
My Family Tree Places.






TOTNES, UK



Totnes is an ancient borough and market town in the South Hams of Devon. In the Doomsday book Totnes consisted of 110 households. The population of Totnes in 1851 was 4419, declined to the 3000s for a few years then in 1901 was 4034.


High Street, Totnes


Henry Robert Crawford of Totnes was a painter, glazier and keeper of donkey chairs. He and his wife Sarah (Nichols) were always mentioned in the newspaper, but not for any grand deeds. It seems they spent a lot of time in trouble and in court. 

Besides two of their shenanigans I have already written about in my family blog, and with the Totnes Bribery Commission which I will write about at some future date, there were some mule problems.

Henry and Sarah were Donkey Chair Proprietors in Totnes. The fare for a donkey chair, according to the 1853 Hand-Book to South Devon, was about one shilling for the first hour, and sixpence per hour after. 


Totnes, Donkey Chair


In August 1854 Henry Crawford made a down payment on a donkey from a guy named Shea, who was leaving for Plymouth. When Crawford went to get the mule, it was sold to another man. Crawford took Shea to court and the judge found for the plaintiff, Crawford.





August 1855 Sarah and Henry Crawford are both accused of letting their mules go in the fields of James Shinner. Both were found guilty and fined £1 11s 3d each plus costs.




This time Henry Crawford is the plaintiff again, bringing action in May 1858 to recover £2 10s for damages done by the defendant to his donkey chair on Easter Sunday. The judge found for the plaintiff for the amount claimed and witness expenses.




Sarah Nichols Crawford is the sister of my 2x great grandmother Elizabeth Nichols, who married George King and immigrated to Canada.




Saturday, 21 April 2018

A - Z Challenge 2018 - S




The Blogging from A to Z Challenge is to post everyday (except Sunday) in the month of April 2016 starting with the letter A and going all the way to Z. The theme I chose is...
My Family Tree Places.





STALMINE, UK



Stalmine, Poulton-le Fylde, Lancashire, England is home to my Singleton ancestors. 




James Singleton, my 3x great uncle, occupied Grange Farm in Stalmine.

Ploughing Matches were events sponsored by local Ploughing Associations and the entrants ploughed part of a field and points were awarded for straightness and neatness of rows. In 1871 the annual Stalmine Ploughing Association ploughing match was held on a field adjoining Grange Farm, occupied by James Singleton. 









This image from Australia is typical of a ploughing match in England.




James was mentioned as a breeder in the Shire Horse Stud Book of 1893, for a horse he bred in 1875.






The Great Depression of British Agriculture occurred about 1873 to 1896. It was caused by cheap grain prices following the American Homestead Act, which opened the prairies to cultivation, plus cheap transportation with the rise in steamships. James tried to hang on to his farm, but in the end he had to file for bankruptcy in 1880.







St James Church served both Stalmine and Preesall, where other of my Singletons lived, until Preesall got it's own church in 1899. The churchyard was consecrated in 1236 and although it is quite small, there is an estimated 3000 people were buried there between 1583 and 1724. 



Surprisingly, many more burials took place in the St James graveyard until 1899. The graveyard being full of "higgledy-piggledy" gravestones it wa haard to keep it tidy and in 1973 the decision was made to remove and clean the gravestones and mount them on the new south wall. 





Some of my Singletons were baptized, married and buried here. 




Friday, 20 April 2018

A - Z Challenge 2018 - R




The Blogging from A to Z Challenge is to post everyday (except Sunday) in the month of April 2016 starting with the letter A and going all the way to Z. The theme I chose is...
My Family Tree Places.





REGINA, SK


Regina is the capital city of the Province of  Saskatchewan and has been home to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Academy ("Depot" Division) since 1885. Before that Regina was headquarters of the North West Mounted Police and then the Royal Northwest Mounted Police. 


Corporal George Seale, 3x cousin 2x removed, was born in Granby Quebec and in 1877 he joined the North West Mounted Police in Montreal. He was given passage to Toronto, signed his Oath of Allegiance in Thunder Bay, then went to Regina for training.  



George was stationed at Cypress Hills, SK. and was there when Sitting Bull came across the border from Montana. 


George was discharged in 1880 and was given a land grant in Manitoba. 


My father-in-law Dollard (Al) Nolin was born in St Boniface, Manitoba and he joined the RCMP on 6 September 1837, doing his training in Regina. Before 1966 all recruits received horse training, and here is Al showing off his skills. 






Al was stationed in Regina Sk, Rockcliffe ON and Montreal QC and was discharged in 1947.




Corporal Chris Seale, my 3x cousin, joined the RCMP in May 1969 at Ottawa, then did his training at "Depot" Regina.  He died January 2000 and was buried in the RCMP Cemetery in Regina. His daughter also joined the RCMP and trained in Regina.

Father-Daughter RCMP


The RCMP is also famous for the Musical Ride which performs at fairs and events across Canada. 






Writing this I came across another Seale (Ernest Charles) that joined the RCMP as a Civilian Member in 1973, and doing a little sleuthing, I discovered he is my 5th cousin. 





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